What a terrible summer we’ve had in Northeast Georgia with pet overpopulation.

All of the surrounding shelters are overrun with unwanted kittens, puppies, dogs and cats and more are coming in all the time. Adoptions just aren’t keeping pace. In fact, I think we’ve pretty much saturated our good home availability.,.. and still there’s more coming to shelters or being dumped.

For the past two weeks, I’ve been feeding three 6 mo old puppies that were dumped near the lake over a month ago. They took up residence on a construction site that will soon be a boat storage and people driving by have stopped to try to rescue them, but no one could catch them.

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They will come right up to you, wagging their whole bodies, but won’t let you touch them.

Finally, animal control humanely trapped two of them and they calmed right down, but their chances of ever being adopted from our crappy shelter are slim to none. Stephens County animal control doesn’t have a formal adoption program, doesn’t do offsite adoptions, and the local governments won’t fund any kind of vet work on the animals there. ..but that’s a whole ‘nother blog.

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So now there’s one black and tan girl left at the job site all by herself. She sleeps under the heavy equipment and the workers throw her scraps. I stop at night on my way home and feed her real dog food. She’s so happy to see me. Then she runs after my truck down the road trying to follow me. It breaks my heart, but I can’t get her to let me touch her. Even if I did, no shelter around here will take her where she’d have a chance of being adopted because dogs like her are a dime a dozen around here. Look how pretty she and her sister are!

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The other problem is, they’re breeding age, which means puppies….more puppies nobody around here wants.

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Several shelters transport dogs to groups around the country, but even those rescue groups have gotten picky and don’t want plain ol’ American Domestic Canines (mutts), according to what one shelter manager told me recently.

So according to the locals, somebody threw these puppies out when they were about 10wks old and they’ve been living by their wits and the kindness of strangers ever since.

BUT WAIT…THERE’S MORE….

The other morning, I’m driving down our dirt road on my way to work and there in the middle of the road is yet another medium-sized black ADC mama with her EIGHT PUPPIES! About 6wks old..each one a different color from a different daddy.

No one around where they were lying claimed them and they were gone the next day, but I found them two roads over this morning. ..when I should have been at work. Mom was sleeping in the front yard of a house. I knock on the door. Nice young couple answers. “Is that your dog and her puppies?” “Heck no! She just showed up and we don’t want em!”

Turns out they leave food on the front porch for their dog and she comes with her puppies at night and eats it. Found out where she stashed the puppies, though.

Next door to them is a burned out lake house with weeds growing up to my waist all around it. This morning, one of the pups, a yellow lab looking one, stuck his little head up above the rubble, wagged his little tail and then darted back under the debris.

How I’m going to get them out of there, I’ll never know..and then once I do…where do I take them? If they go to our crappy animal shelter, they’ll get parvo and be euthanized within days. Almost no one comes there to adopt a dog or puppy. With 12 kennel runs, many times there are 4 – 6 dogs crammed into one small run with NO access to the outside. It’s really really bad.

This mama dog actually has on a collar so everyone has assumed she belongs to someone, but apparently not. She’s skinny, her milk is drying up and the puppies need to be gotten before they starve.

sigh. what to do, what to do. I put out pleas to local rescue groups for help and have not received one answer or offer. Not because they don’t want to help, but because every shelter and rescue group in Georgia and South Carolina is overflowing.

Still, I’m not going to allow those puppies to starve, be eaten by coyotes or shot – all of which could happen here in the boonies. “Something will turn up.”

It never ends.

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